Compound Subjects

French compound subjectsWhen the subject of a French verb is nous, vous, ils, or elles, it's obvious which verb conjugation you need, because those plural pronouns are included in verb tables. But it's a bit trickier with compound subjects made up of multiple names, nouns, and/or pronouns. In these cases, you need to take a moment to figure out which plural subject pronoun those items add up to, so that you know what to conjugate for.

   

Compound Tenses and Moods: Word Order

French word orderCompound tenses and moods are verb forms which are conjugated with two parts: a helping / auxiliary verb and a past participle, as in J'ai dansé. The word order can get a little complicated when additional grammatical structures like object pronouns and negation are introduced.

   

Connectives

French connectivesConnectives are links: they combine words, phrases, or sentences. Connectives do not constitute a single part of speech, but rather a category of terms including all conjunctions and prepositions as well as certain types of adverbs and pronouns used in this way.

   

Demonstrative Pronouns

French demonstrative pronounsDemonstrative pronouns (celui, celle, ceux, celles) replace a specific noun that was mentioned previously. In French, they must agree with the noun(s) in number and gender.

   

Direct Objects

French direct objectsA direct object is a noun, whether person or thing, that someone or something acts upon or does something to. In both French and English, direct objects are often replaced with direct object pronouns (COD): me, te, le, la, nous, vous, les.

   

Direct vs Indirect Objects

French direct vs indirect object pronounsDirect objects and indirect objects can be tricky to understand and use, but it's essential to know the difference in order to speak and write French correctly. Here are some tips to help you figure out which type of object you're dealing with.

   

   

Dont – Relative Pronoun

Dont - French relative pronounThe relative pronoun dont replaces the preposition de plus a person or thing and serves as the object of a relative clause. Depending on the context, dont has a number of possible translations.

   

Double Pronoun Order

French double pronoun word orderSometimes one pronoun just isn't enough. A sentence might need both a direct and indirect object, or a reflexive pronoun as well as an adverbial. When this happens, word order becomes an issue: how do you know which pronoun to place first? It's actually pretty easy, once you learn the rules.