Adjectives

French adjectivesOne of the eight parts of speech, adjectives are a type of modifier; that is, they modify or describe nouns in a certain way, letting you know the size, shape, weight, color, nationality, or any of a myriad other possible qualities of nouns.

   

Adjectives Functioning as Adverbs

French adjectives used as adverbsBy definition, adjectives modify nouns. But more than 30 French adjectives can sometimes modify verbs instead, thus taking on the role and characteristics of adverbs, including the fact that they are invariable.

   

   

Agreement with Direct Objects

French agreement with direct objectsMost French verbs are conjugated with avoir as their auxiliary verb in compound tenses and moods, and therefore do not require agreement with their subjects. But avoir verbs do need agreement in a very specific construction: the past participle must agree with the direct object when it precedes the verb.

   

Agreement with Pronominal Verbs

French agreement with pronominal verbsAll pronominal verbs are être verbs in compound tenses and moods like the passé composé, which means that the past participles must agree with their subjects - at least in theory. In fact, it's not quite so straightforward.

   

Agreement with Subjects

French agreement with subjectsThe three French verb constructions which include some form of être plus a past participle usually require grammatical agreement of the past participle with the subject.

   

   

   

   

Definite Article – le, la, l’, les

French definite articleThe French definite articles (le, la, l', les) indicate either a particular noun or, contrarily, the general sense of a noun. They're used similarly to their English counterpart "the," but there are many instances where a definite article is required in French but not English.

   

Demonstrative Adjectives

French demonstrative adjectivesDemonstrative adjectives (this, that) are used to indicate a specific noun or nouns. In French, they must agree with the noun(s) in number and sometimes gender: ce, cette, cet, ces.

   

   

Impersonal Pronouns

French impersonal pronounsImpersonal pronouns do not have different forms for each grammatical person, though some have different forms that agree with the nouns they replace.

   

   

Indefinite Pronouns

French indefinite pronounsIndefinite pronouns are vague - they either refer to unspecific nouns (like un autre and quelque chose) or make sweeping generalizations (on, tout le monde).