Adverbial Pronouns / Pronominal Adverbs

French adverbial pronounsAs you might guess from their name, adverbial pronouns are caught between two worlds: they are pronouns in the sense that they replace nouns, and at the same time they are adverbs representing a place, a quantity, or the object of a proposition. French has two adverbial pronouns: en and y.

   

   

   

   

Demonstrative Pronouns

French demonstrative pronounsDemonstrative pronouns (celui, celle, ceux, celles) replace a specific noun that was mentioned previously. In French, they must agree with the noun(s) in number and gender.

   

Direct Objects

French grammarA direct object is a noun, whether person or thing, that someone or something acts upon or does something to. In both French and English, direct objects are often replaced with direct object pronouns (COD): me, te, le, la, nous, vous, les.

   

Dont – Relative Pronoun

Dont - French relative pronounThe relative pronoun dont replaces the preposition de plus a person or thing and serves as the object of a relative clause. Depending on the context, dont has a number of possible translations.

   

Double Pronoun Order

French word orderSometimes one pronoun just isn't enough. A sentence might need both a direct and indirect object, or a reflexive pronoun as well as an adverbial. When this happens, word order becomes an issue: how do you know which pronoun to place first? It's actually pretty easy, once you learn the rules.

   

   

   

   

   

Indefinite Pronouns

French indefinite pronounsIndefinite pronouns are vague - they either refer to unspecific nouns (like un autre and quelque chose) or make sweeping generalizations (on, tout le monde).

   

Indefinite Relative Pronouns

French indefinite relative pronounsIndefinite relative pronouns (ce dont, ce que, ce qui, ce à quoi) are connectors: they link relative clauses to main clauses and, unlike normal relative pronouns, do not not have a specific antecedent.