Masculine Nouns

French gender
There's no simple trick to knowing the gender of every single French noun (other than looking in a dictionary), but there are several categories of words that are always or usually masculine.

   

Mauvais vs Mal

Mauvais vs malThe French words mauvais and mal can be tricky for French students because they both belong to three different parts of speech and have similar meanings. If you have a poor understanding of the difference, it wouldn't be a bad idea to read this lesson.

   

Multiplicative Numbers

French multiplicative numbers
Multiplicative numbers are, unsurprisingly, words used to multiply nouns. The numbers themselves can be adjectives or nouns - either way, their gender agrees with the nouns they modify / replace.

   

Non-adjectives

French adjectivesAdjectives comprise one of the eight French parts of speech, but certain members of other grammatical categories can sometimes be used as adjectives. These "non-adjectives" are invariable: there's no gender/number agreement with the nouns they modify.

   

Nouns

French grammarOne of the eight parts of speech, a noun is commonly defined as "a person, place, or thing." If that seems vague, that's because it is.

   

   

   

   

Plural Nouns

Plural French nounsWhile most nouns, in both French and English, can be singular or plural, some can only be one or the other - and dozens of these don't "match up" in the two languages. The nouns on this page are plural in French but singular in English.

   

   

Prepositions with Nouns

French prepositions with nounsGenerally speaking, articles are much more common in French than in English, but there are exceptions, such as when certain prepositions are followed by nouns.

   

   

Singular Nouns

Singular French nounsWhile most nouns, in both French and English, can be singular or plural, some can only be one or the other - and dozens of these don't "match up" in the two languages. The nouns on this page are singular in French but plural in English.

   

To Make – Faire vs Rendre

Faire vs rendreWhen someone is made to feel a certain way, that feeling is always expressed in English with an adjective: happy, ashamed, thirsty, etc. In French, however, some feelings are adjectives while others are nouns - and these two different parts of speech require different verbs. When it comes to feelings, the French equivalent of "to make" may be rendre, faire, or donner, depending on whether the feeling is an adjective or a noun.